Monday, 24 April 2017

Dangerous dreams: new Monash research reveals the health consequences of children's snoring

Professor Rosemary Horne
Up to 30 per cent of children snore, with pre-schoolers more likely to be affected than older children. Approximately five per cent of children will suffer from obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), when the airways briefly collapse during sleep, blood oxygen levels fall and sleep is disrupted. Most Australian parents believe their child’s snoring is harmless and something they will grow out of. 

New research from Monash University – that will continue to be undertaken at the newly opened MonashChildren’s Hospital - reveals this snoring is not harmless but may have long term cardiovascular, neurocognitive and behavioural implications.

Monash Professor Rosemary Horne and her team studied 136 children aged 7-12 years and 128 children aged 3-5 years to examine the consequences of snoring and OSA. Children were then followed up three to four years later to examine the effects of treatment or resolution of symptoms.

The team found that pre-school children who snore had normal blood pressure and neurocognitive development but had increased reports of poor behaviour. The older, school aged children (7-12 years) had:

·         Increased blood pressure of 10-15 mmHg
·         Increased reports of poor behaviour
·         Reduced intellectual ability

When they were followed up, any improvement in severity of snoring or OSA was associated with improvements in blood pressure and behaviour but not cognitive function. According to Professor Horne, the findings that consequences are more severe in older children indicate that the long term effects of snoring are cumulative, impacting on the child’s cardiovascular health, as well as on long term behaviour, learning and cognitive development.

Previous studies have shown that oxygen concentration in the blood (measured with a sensor on the finger) is the same between the snoring children and those that didn’t snore – suggesting that low oxygen is either not the explanation for the findings or the current methods of measuring this may not be sensitive enough.

Professor Horne is currently using MRI scans and direct non-invasive measurements of oxygen levels in the brain to determine whether there are more subtle effects of oxygen deprivation happening in the brains of children who snore, affecting blood pressure and behaviour.

Professor Horne said the most common cause of childhood snoring is enlarged tonsils and adenoids. More than 50,000 Australian children have a tonsillectomy and/or an adenoidectomy each year, many of which are for sleep apnoea. 

“Our results indicate that snoring and sleep apnoea have important implications for children’s health and parents should consider getting medical advice about the need for surgery,” Professor Horne said.

The MRI study, led by Professor Horne, will continue in the Melbourne Children’s Sleep Centre in the new Monash Children’s Hospital.



Early clues from placenta may predict future life threatening lung problems in premature infants

Professor Arvind Sehgal
New research from Monash University’s Professor of Pediatrics, Arvind Sehgal has provided early clues from the placenta, which may indicate which infants among this high risk cohort might go on to develop BPD associated PH during the weeks or months following birth. This opens avenues for individualized ventilator management, watching out for early signs of this complication, early echocardiographic diagnosis and therapy to improve lung function.

Each year in Australia, approximately 500 infants are born at less than 25 weeks gestation. These infants are very premature and experience a number of life-threatening issues.

More than one third of these babies develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) - also known as chronic lung disease -combined with chronic pulmonary hypertension (PH), or high blood pressure, in the lungs. These infants experience long and repeated hospitalisations, requiring home oxygen for up to two years and an increased risk of mortality because of a vulnerability to infection.

Professor Sehgal and his research team, including pathologist Dr Yuen Chan, tested the placentas of 56 mothers of very preterm babies (<28 weeks gestation) and noted peculiar histopathology markers which predicted ‘subsequent’ complications of BPD associated PH. These findings will be presented at the prestigious Society for Pediatric Research Annual Meeting, being held in San Francisco, USA in May 2017.

“The ability to predict which infants may become very sick will provide critical information for doctors managing these premature infants,” Professor Sehgal said.


Professor Sehgal’s research group is the first in Australasia to demonstrate that the placenta contains a treasure trove of relevant information which can be used to improve the outlook for these premature infants.

Australian military doctors and scientists recognised in latest book

Associate Professor Geoff Quail
In his recent book, former Monash University lecturer and surgeon Associate Professor Geoff Quail reveals how past Australian military mistakes led to devastating health consequences for personnel.

Published last month, Lessons Learned: The Australian Military and Tropical Medicine recognises the Army’s Tropical Disease Research units and the efforts of individuals in helping the military succeed in battle.

Associate Professor Quail said he was compelled to write the booked as there had been no comprehensive assessment of the very substantial contribution of the Australian Army doctors and scientists since the inception of the Australian Army Medical Corps in 1901.

“Historically, prolonged campaigns have frequently been won or lost because of greater fitness of one of the combatant armies,” said Associate Professor Quail.

“In the twentieth century, infection was still a major problem contributing substantially to the necessity of withdrawal from Gallipoli and the near defeat of the Allies due to malaria in the Second World War's Pacific campaign.  Malaria emerged again as a major problem in the Vietnam War.” 

Associate Professor Quail said we ignore the past at our peril. 

“In hindsight it is difficult to understand why past failures were disregarded when it was known that health of the contingent is pivotal to success in the field.”

“The Australian Army Medical Corps learned from past medical experience, however, errors leading to significant morbidity did occur mainly in relation to malaria, in particular inadequate prophylactic measures, early in the New Guinea campaign of World War Two.”

“The failure to perceive the threat of emerging resistant strains of malaria in the 1960s and military commanders not fully implementing the recommendations of their medical advisers were other mistakes.”

Many Australian military campaigns and deployments have taken place in the tropics where infection is still a major concern. 

“It is not well known that Australian military doctors and scientists have made, and continue to make through the Australian Malaria Institute, a substantial contribution to tropical medicine,” said Associate Professor Quail. 

“Their work extends well beyond the requirements of the military, greatly improving health outcomes for people residing in the tropics.”

Two institutions, the Land Headquarters Medical Research Unit led by Brigadier Hamilton Fairley in World War Two and the today's Army Malaria Institute in Townsville have world-wide reputations for the quality of their research.

Associate Professor Quail’s book recognises the efforts and details the scientific work of both individuals and the Australian Army's Tropical Research units in protecting the health of Army personnel whilst on deployment and the potential benefits of its finding for all people in the tropics.


Monash visit to Vietnam opens research collaboration opportunities

Professor Liem Nguyen, Professor Graham Jenkin
with delegates 
Last week, Professor Graham Jenkin, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, was the guest of honour and Plenary Speaker at the Vinmec inaugural "Workshop on application of stem cell and gene technology in cerebral palsy and severe diseases diagnosis and treatment" held in Nhin Binh, Vietnam.

Professor Jenkin was hosted by Professor Nguyen Thanh Liem, Director of the Vinmec Research Institute of Stem Cell and Gene Technology at Vinmec International Hospital in Hanoi. Vinmec is the Hospital arm of the VinGroup, comprising six major hospitals in Vietnam and voted by the Hospital Management Association of Asia as Vietnam's most progressive hospital. 

The Flagship hospital is located in Vinmec Times City in Hanoi, which also houses their state of the art research laboratories. 

"These laboratories include the Stem Cell and Gene Technology Centre and the Vinmec Assisted Reproductive Technologies Centre," Professor Jenkin said. 

"Professor Nguyen, the Director, already has a long term collaboration with Associate Professor Chris Kimber, Head of Paediatric Surgery at Monash Children's Hospital."

As a result of a visit to the Monash Health Translation Precinct (MHTP) in December last year, Professor Nguyen and Professor Jenkin recognised there was significant potential for interaction and collaboration between the two Centres, as well as with the recently opened Monash Children’s Hospital.

Around 80 Vinmec staff and research professionals attended Professor Jenkin's presentations, which included an overview of the MHTP Translational Research Facility and talks about the research being undertaken by the Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine Group, headed by Professor Jenkin, and the Fetal and Neonatal Health Neuroprotection Group, headed by Associate Professor Suzie Miller.

"The Vinmec Institute presented on their clinical translation research and trials on use of stem cells in the treatment of cerebral palsy, broncho pulmonary displasia, autism and liver fibrosis after biliary atrophy surgery; as well as on gene mutations in autistic children and gene therapy for RETT syndrome," Professor Jenkin said.

Professor Nguyen will pay a reciprocal visit to the MHTP in November this year. Anyone interested in meeting with Professor Nguyen should contact Professor Graham Jenkin.

Congratulations Steven Cho on the award of his PhD

Congratulations Steven Cho on the award of his PhD this month.   
            
Steven’s thesis expanded on unravelling the complex immune pathways that are involved in the pathogenesis of necrotising enterocolitis, and addressed an urgent unmet need by identifying interleukin-37 as a potential therapeutic agent.

Steven thanks The Ritchie Centre for providing support and opportunities such as PSANZ to showcase his research, as well as staff at the animal house for accommodating the odd requests needed for his project.

Monash Health International Clinical Trials Day, 18 May


The Falling Walls Lab Australia 2017

The Australian Academy of Science invites applications from Australian, New Zealand and Pacific Island Forum (PIF) Nations researchers, postdocs and students, entrepreneurs, engineers and innovators from all areas to attend the Falling Walls Lab Australia 2017. Deadline for applications is 5pm (AEST) Monday 12 June 2017.

20 Australian and 5 New Zealand/PIF Nations contestants will be invited to participate in this challenge with each required to give a 3 minute presentation on their research, business model or initiative based on the “Which walls will fall next” concept.
Candidates should be research active in any field of the natural sciences, including technology, engineering and medicine as well as social sciences and humanities.

See the website for the application forms and further details

Eligibility Requirements:
Applicants must:
be either:
  • an Australian or New Zealand citizen
  • an Australian permanent resident or hold a valid student or working visa
  • a New Zealand permanent resident or hold a valid student or working visa
  • a citizen or resident of a PIF Nation outside Australia and New Zealand
You must be based in either Australia, New Zealand, or a PIF Nation at the time of application
You must be 18 years of age or over
You must be currently enrolled in university or hold a degree (copy of degree may be required)

Applicants must either:
  • hold a bachelor’s degree which must have been received within ten (10) years prior to 1 January 2017 (i.e. conferred on or after 1 January 2007)
  • hold a master’s degree which must have been received within seven (7) years prior to 1 January 2017 (i.e. conferred on or after 1 January 2010)
  • hold a PhD which must have been received within five (5) years prior to 1 January 2017 (i.e. conferred on or after 1 January 2012)
Applicants must hold a passport valid until at least April 2018

Submission process:
Applications are to be submitted by the researchers directly to the funder.

PURE records must be submitted ahead of the funder's submission date for school and faculty approval.

MHTP Bioinformatics seminar: "Transcription Factors identification with CiiiDER", 26 April

Wed 26 April, 2.30pm-4.30pm - Seminar room 3, level 2, TRF

Identifying the important transcription factors regulating your genes of interest can be daunting. So come along to the CiiiDER seminar and we may be able to point you in the right direction!

CiiiDER is a user-friendly tool for predicting and analysing transcription factor binding sites, designed with biologists in mind. CiiiDER can predict potential transcription factor binding sites within sequences, identify those transcription factors that are significantly enriched in co-expressed genes and remodel transcription factor motifs to reflect the predicted sites.

In this session we will first introduce you to the analysis methods used by CiiiDER and demonstrate its features. Following this, there will be a training session for people interested in getting hands-on experience using the software. 

This seminar will be presented by Dr Helen Cumming, Dr Jamie Gearing and Isaac Woodhouse from the Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Diseases, and on behalf of the MHTP Bioinformatics affinity group. 


For more information or to join the bioinformatics affinity group please contact: roxane.legaie@monash.edu

Hudson Seminar Series - Professor Katharina Gaus, Thurs 27th April

This week's Hudson Seminar will be held Thursday 27th April 2017 at 12.00pm-1.00pm in Seminar rooms 1 & 2, Level 2, TRF Building.
The speaker will be Scientia Professor Katharina Gaus, NHMRC Senior Research Fellow, and Head of the EMBL Australia Node in Single Molecule Science at the University of New South Wales. 

She will be presenting "T cell receptor clustering - a mechanism of signal transduction"

Scientia Professor Katharina Gaus is an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow at the University of New South Wales and Head of the EMBL Australia Node in Single Molecule Science. She received her PhD from the University of Cambridge in 1999 and has led an independent research group since 2005. Her group investigates signal transduction processes in T lymphocytes with advanced fluorescence microscopy approaches. She was awarded the Young Investigator Award from the Australia and New Zealand Society for Cell and Developmental Biology (2010), the Gottschalk Medal from the Australian Academy of Science (2012) and the New South Wales Science and Engineering Award for Excellence in Biological Sciences (2013). 

Professor Sanchia Aranda, Union for International Cancer Control, 1 May

You are invited to a presentation by Professor Sanchia Aranda, CEO, Cancer Council Australia and President, Union for International Cancer Control (UICC).

Monday 1 May, 4pm, Lecture Theatre 3, MMC

There are limited places available  Register your attendance to this event HERE

RSVP by 26th April 2017 or email penny.walker@monashhealth.org

Prep for success with VCA’s 2017 funding round: a seminar to assist potential applicants, 9 May

Speaker Dr George Grigoriadis,
VCA Clinical Research Fellow
4.30-5.30pm, Tuesday 9 May, Room G35, Ground Floor, 19 Innovation Walk (bldg 76 & 77), Monash University, Clayton Campus

Victorian Cancer Agency’s 2017 round is coming soon! You’ve got to be in it to win it…

Meet MPCCC’s panel of current VCA fellows and grantees and discover:

 Examples of people and projects funded in previous years
 What are the elements of a winning application?
 How can you optimise your submission?
 What resources are available to support you?
 Interactive Q&A with potential applicants

RSVP: anna.kilgour@monash.edu by 8 May

PhD milestone review, Khai Gene Leong, "Cyclophilins in renal disease", 3 May

All staff and students are invited to Khai Gene Leong's PhD milestone review seminar.

9.30 - 11am, 3 May, Conference Room, Department of Nephrology, MMC


                      Synopsis:   Inflammation and apoptosis are important underlying causes of renal injury/ dysfunction, and progressive renal fibrosis leading to chronic kidney disease. However, despite the large burden of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), there is no current successful clinical therapeutics that halts the process of AKI, and progression of AKI to CKD. Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that are physiologically involved in protein folding. Of these, Cyclophilin A (CypA) has a key role in regulating the inflammatory process, and Cyclophlin D (CypD) is an essential component of the mitochondrial permeability membrane pore opening leading to cell death. I will explore the roles of CypA and CypD in contributing to renal disease to aid in future development of therapeutics that may lessen the incidence and prevalence of AKI and CKD.

Supervisors: A/Prof David Nikolic-Paterson; A/Prof John Kanellis; Dr. Frank Ma

Panel Chair:   Prof Michael Hickey


Independent asssessors:      Prof Peter Kerr; Dr. Daniel Bird

NEW FRONTIERS IN CANCER RESEARCH: Inaugural VCCC Postdoctoral Symposium, 26 May

All early and mid-career researchers across Victoria are encouraged to share their latest achievements in all aspects of cancer research, including basic biology, translational research, molecular pathology, bioinformatics, stem cells, epigenetics, clinical trials, genomics and immunology. 
Featuring plenary lectures, poster sessions and networking opportunities, this conference will provide an excellent forum for both experienced and new investigators to share data and interact with colleagues. We look forward to welcoming you to the exceptional new VCCC facility. 

Registration is FREE and includes morning tea, lunch, afternoon tea and a networking session.

Final deadline for registrations and dietary requirements: Friday 19 May 2017 

Plenary Speakers:



Annual Australian Society for Medical Research (ASMR) Student Symposium – ABSTRACT DEADLINE EXTENSION

The abstract submission deadline for the annual ASMR student symposium has been extended to 28 April 2017,  5pm. Abstract submission is open for all honours, graduate and post graduate science research students in Victoria. 

For more details, see:  asmr.org.au/asmr-mrw/victoria/



The Australian-French Entrepreneurship Challenge 2017

The Australian Academy of Science invites applications from Australian PhD students from all areas to participate in the Australian-French Entrepreneurship Challenge 2017. Deadline for applications is 9am (AEST) Monday 8 May 2017.


Up to 70 contestants will participate in a continuous 24 hour period, following workshops and mentoring, to develop a pitch to win over a grand jury of expert entrepreneurs, scientist and managers. Participants will compete for a chance to travel to France for a first-hand experience of the country’s innovation system.
Candidates should be research active in any field of the natural sciences, including technology, engineering and medicine as well as social sciences and humanities.

See the website for the application form and further details.

MRO SUBMISSION PROCESS:
Applications must be submitted to funder by MRO.
Funder's Deadline: 9am, Monday 8 May
MRO Deadline:
 4pm, Friday 5 May
Please submit the applications to the MRO through PURE.
Funding Opportunity: Australian-French Entrepreneurship Challenge
Funder: Australian Academy of Science

Due to the funder's deadline being 9am on a Monday, we will appreciate submissions coming in as early as possible to avoid issues with submission.





Travel grants to the 19th EMBL PhD Symposium (Heidelberg, Germany)

PhD Symposium Grant: Australian PhD students in the life sciences are invited to apply for one of 10 travel grants to attend the 19th EMBL PhD Symposium in Heidelberg, Germany, from 19 to 21 October, 2017. More details are HERE.

Short Term Travel Grants: PhD students and post docs in the life sciences are also still able to apply for one of 7 travel grants to attend a short course at one of EMBL's prestigious facilities. Information and application forms can be found at http://emblaustralia.org/careers-education/funding-and-grants/short-term-travel-grants-embl

About the 19th EMBL PhD Symposium in Heidelberg, Germany

The symposium is an annual event, organised by first-year PhD students at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany. It brings together fellow students from around the world for a three-day series of talks by leading experts and by students themselves. It’s an opportunity to make connections with international scientists and get new insight into your own research direction.

This year’s theme is ‘Bridging the Gaps: Interdisciplinary Approaches in Life Sciences’. The symposium will depict a broad range of interdisciplinary approaches that bear great potential in explicitly defining and successfully resolving complex biological problems. The program includes networking opportunities, poster sessions and workshops with experts.

Find more information about the symposium and speakers here.

Who is eligible to receive the travel grants?

The grants are open to students in almost any field – biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, informatics, engineering and molecular medicine – who are currently enrolled in a PhD program at an Australian university and have not yet submitted a thesis. Applications will be reviewed and ranked solely on the basis of qualification and scientific potential by the EMBL Australia Travel Grant selection committee.

How do I apply?

Applications for grants of up to $3000 are open until 31 July. Apply online here.

For queries or further information, contact student.admin@emblaustralia.org


3 Minute Thesis competition – registrations open!

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is a competition held annually at every Australian university where Graduate Research students have the opportunity to present their research in only 3 minutes! Faculty winners will compete at the University Finals. Eligible graduate research students are invited to participate. Registration is open now, closing Wednesday 31 May 2017.

Save the date for the Faculty 3MT Final which will be held on Thursday 13 July 2017, 1.30 – 3pm.  Registration link

Fantastic Faculty prizes are on offer: 1st place $800, 2nd place $500, 3rd place $300 and MPA people’s choice award of $50.


Innovation Bootcamp - Opportunity for Graduate Research students, 5-6 May

The "Innovation Bootcamp" is a two-day intensive program designed to give Graduate Research students an immersive introduction into the world of innovation capture, entrepreneurship and technology transfer.

Date: 
​Friday 5 May​ from 9-5pm & Saturday 6 May​ from 9-3pm 2017
Location: Clayton Campus - To be advised
Cost: Free
Catering: Fully catered for both days
Registration Deadline: 28 ​April​ 2017

​Registration is limited to 40 students, so get in early.
Please ensure you are definitely available to attend both days before signing up.

Any questions? Please contact fit-studentengagement@monash.edu

Important: Changes to Graduate Research Scholarship Rounds

The recruitment of talented and high quality students worldwide is one of the key strategies of Monash University. To help achieve this goal, the university has reviewed current practice and announced two significant changes with regards to graduate research student recruitment:
  • Increase from two to four graduate research scholarship rounds per year; and
  • Separation of domestic and international applicants for scholarship rounds.
This initiative led by Monash Graduate Education (MGE), will take better advantage of the recruitment windows for applicants from the northern hemisphere, and ensure competitiveness for both local and international markets. Changes will be implemented from 1 June 2017 following the closure of applications for the current scholarship round.
 
The table below highlights the key dates for the current round and each of the new scholarship rounds:


Note that there is no change to the current Scholarship Round closing Wednesday 31 May 2017 that is open to BOTH domestic and international applicants.

Applications for the new, separate scholarship rounds 3 and 4/2017 will open on 1 June 2017 as indicated in the table above.
 
Further Information
For more detail about the change to Graduate Research Scholarship Rounds, please refer to the following MGE Intranet page.

Position available: MCHRI Business Manager

MCHRI Business Manager, HS3 (with over award allowance commensurate with experience) at a 0.7-0.9EFT, Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, based at MMC Clayton 
  • Join our respected and dynamic team 
  • Make a difference by supporting the collaborative efforts of Monash Health to sustain and grow clinical research
About the Role
We are seeking an enthusiastic candidate to undertake the Business Management within the Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation. Ideally you should have experience in research, research management, and project co-ordination. This position will manage the business for a team of researchers running clinical research programs, translation and implementation programs, methodological platforms as well as providing support to casual staff and Higher Degree Research students as required. Whilst these staff and students will not report to the manager, they will engage and support HR, finance and business development and funding proposals and in engagement across Monash Health.
This role is integral to the running of this rapidly growing team, being a part of an extensive range of activities undertaken within MCHRI. Our team is friendly, supportive, hardworking and strongly committed to improving health outcomes. Working hours are flexible.

More information HERE or at Monash Health HERE:

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP in Molecular Genetics, NIH, Arizona

We are utilizing genomic tools (whole genome sequence data, methylation data, large-scale association analyses) to identify and characterize novel genes that cause type 2 diabetes and obesity in human populations.

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP in Molecular Genetics at the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), in Phoenix, Arizona. We are utilizing genomic tools (whole genome sequence data, methylation data, large-scale association analyses) to identify and characterize novel genes that cause type 2 diabetes and obesity in human populations. Applicants must have a PhD. or M.D. degree obtained within the past 5 years, with research experience in molecular genetics related to complex disease. Please send curriculum vitae to Dr. Clifton Bogardus. 445 North 5th Street, Suite 210, National Institutes of Health, Phoenix, AZ 85004. email: cbogardus@phx.niddk.nih.gov
Your reference:
Diabetes Molecular Genetics Section
Alternative label:
Phoenix, Arizona 
Salary band:
from: US$30,000 to: $49,999 (this is not shown in the ad)
Salary description:
DOE Salary ranges from US$44,900 to $54,100 per annum plus benefits 
Discipline:
Life Sciences, Bioinformatics, Genetics, Genomics
Position Type:
Full Time
Job Type:
Postdoc, Postdoc Fellowship
Application method:
Send an email to the job contact
Contact email:
cbogardus@phx.niddk.nih.gov (applications are emailed to this address)
Employer name:

National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) 

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP in Bioinformatics, NIH, Arizona

We are utilizing genomic tools (whole genome sequence data, methylation data, large-scale association analyses) to identify and characterize novel genes that cause type 2 diabetes and obesity in human populations.

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP in Bioinformatics at the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), in Phoenix, Arizona. We are utilizing genomic tools (whole genome sequence data, methylation data, large-scale association analyses) to identify and characterize novel genes that cause type 2 diabetes and obesity in human populations. Applicants must have a PhD. or M.D. degree obtained within the past 5 years, with research experience in computational genomics related to complex disease. Please send curriculum vitae to Dr. Clifton Bogardus. 445 North 5th Street, Suite 210, National Institutes of Health, Phoenix, AZ 85004. email: cbogardus@phx.niddk.nih.gov
Your reference:
Diabetes Molecular Genetics Section
Alternative label:
Phoenix, Arizona 
Salary band:
from: US$30,000 to: $49,999 
Salary description:
DOE Salary ranges from US$44,900 to $54,100 per annum plus benefits (this is shown in the ad) (this is shown in the ad)
Discipline:
Life Sciences, Bioinformatics, Genetics, Genomics
Position Type:
Full Time
Job Type:
Postdoc, Postdoc Fellowship
Application method:
Send an email to the job contact
Contact email:
cbogardus@phx.niddk.nih.gov (applications are emailed to this address)
Employer name:
National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH)


Participants needed to take part in a diabetes clinical trial

We are looking for individuals with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes (diet-controlled or on Metformin) aged 18 to 70 years to participate in a clinical trial at Monash Medical Centre, Clayton. The study will involve around 5 visits over a period of 14 weeks. You get a free assessment of your diabetes and cardiovascular risk and $100 visa card or gift card of your choice as a token of appreciation. If you are interested, please don’t hesitate to contact Josphin Johnson at 0385722629 or email: med-carnosineir@monash.edu for further information. 

Are you:
  • A pre-diabetic OR have type 2 diabetes (diet-controlled or taking Metformin only)
  • Aged between 18 and 70 years
  • Someone with no significant weight change in the last 6 months or have no intention to lose weight in the next 3 months
  • Not taking other regular medications
  • Someone with no significant diseases that require treatment
  • A non-smoker, non-drug user, non-high alcohol intake
  • Not lactating, pregnant or planning to be in next 4-6 months
  • Living in Melbourne
What is in it for you?
  • $100 visa card or gift card of your choice as a token of appreciation
  • Free Diabetes and Cardiovascular risk assessment
  • Free body fat and muscle assessment (around $200 value)
  • Free Fibroscan to assess condition of your liver
  • Free routine blood tests
  • Free cognitive tests

This study involves around 4-6 visits over a period of approximately 14 weeks and takes place at Monash Medical Centre in Clayton. Medical certificates can be provided when needed.
For further information, or to take part, please contact Josphin Johnson @ 0385722629 or Email: med-carnosineir@monash.edu
(This study has approval from the Monash Health Human Research Ethics Committee–Project Number 16061A).

M-Pass program (new ID cards, Managed Print Services, and integrated payment gateway)

As advised in previous issues of SCS e-News, the University is currently rolling-out the M-Pass program that includes a new staff card, the Managed Print Service (MPS) and an integrated payment gateway for students and staff. New ID cards have been mailed to your postal address. Staff can ensure that their details are correct via 
https://eservices.monash.edu.au/irj/portal

Students can updated their details at: my.monash.edu.au/wes

The M-Pass cards will provide access to buildings that are fitted with card-readers, including the MIMR Building, which has now been activated.

 Please visit the M-Pass program information site for further details:
https://sites.google.com/a/monash.edu/cards-print-pay/?pli=1

Transforming Clayton campus: information session, 1 May

The University's Buildings and Property Division would like to update you on current developments and recent milestones, as well as highlight a number of future projects.
Please find details of an upcoming information session to be hosted by Buildings and Property for staff and students at Clayton campus:

Date: Monday 1 May
Time: 11 – 12.30pm
Location: Banquet Room, Level 1 / 21 Chancellors Walk (Campus Centre), Clayton

During this information session, we will update you on the progress of our major projects, reflect on improvements to our service delivery and highlight key aspects of the future program of work. We would also like to give you the opportunity to table your questions and feedback in a scheduled Q&A session. 

We’re working hard to minimise disruption and inconvenience during this unprecedented period of development for the campus. I encourage anyone interested in learning more about our exciting developments to attend this information session. 

Please register via the online booking system.

Melbourne research to be a lifesaver for prem babies

Arvind Sehgal's research published in The Age.

Read article here.

New data shows snoring kids face higher medical risks

Rosemary Horne published in the Herald Sun.

Read article here.

Pregnant women's attitudes toward antenatal pertussis vaccination

Michelle Giles et al. published in the Australia and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Read letter here.

Accuracy of PECARN, CATCH, and CHALICE head injury decision rules in children: a prospective cohort study

John Cheek et al. published in The Lancet.

Read article here.

The clinical academic workforce in Australia and New Zealand: report on the second binational summit to implement a sustainable training pathway

Julian Smith et al. published in the Internal Medicine Journal.

Read article here.

Mortality Reduction for Fever, Hyperglycemia, and Swallowing Nurse-Initiated Stroke Intervention: QASC Trial (Quality in Acute Stroke Care) Follow-Up

Dominique Cadilhac et al. published in Stroke.

Read article here.

Paediatric lumbar punctures: How do paediatric and emergency doctors differ?

John Cheek et al. published in Emergency Medicine Australasia.

Read article here.

Managing Patients With Large Ischemic Core-What Is in a Match?

Thanh Phan, Henry Ma published in JAMA Neurology.

Read article here.

Fetal growth restricted preterm infants display compromised autonomic cardiovascular control on the first postnatal day but not during infancy

Emily Cohen et al. published in Pediatric Research.

Read article here.

Blocked, Delayed, or Obstructed: What Causes Poor White Matter Development in Intrauterine Growth Restricted Infants?

Flora Wong et al. published in Progress in Neurobiology.

Read article here.

Management of dengue in Australian travellers: a retrospective multicentre analysis

Tony Korman et al. published in the Medical Journal of Australia.

Read article here.

Empiric antibiotic regimens for neonatal sepsis in Australian and New Zealand neonatal intensive care units

Jim Buttery et al. published in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health.

Read article here.

Ovine multiparity is associated with diminished vaginal muscularis, increased elastic fibres and vaginal wall weakness: implication for pelvic organ prolapse

Stuart Emmerson et al. published in Scientific Reports.

Read article here.

Lung hypoplasia in newborn rabbits with a diaphragmatic hernia affects pulmonary ventilation but not perfusion

Stuart Hooper et al. published in Pediatric Research.

Read article here.

Perinatal Brain Injury As a Consequence of Preterm Birth and Intrauterine Inflammation: Designing Targeted Stem Cell Therapies

Madison Paton et al. published in Frontiers in Neuroscience.

Read article here.